Recycling human hair

There are lots of great uses for human hair. Instead of throwing it away, it can be put to good use around your home. In fact, using cut hair for jewelry, clothes, sculptures, fertilizer and even furniture is not very uncommon, a practice. It can be used again for your pets, made into clothing, and even provides soft bedding and shelter for the birds. If you have birds nesting in your garden, you can leave the hair for them to use as a building material. Hair clippings of humans can be used to deter snails from your prized vegetables. Human hair can be used to keep pests out of your garden. One can leave shed out hair and hair clippings around the garden to deter skunks, rats, rabbits and other animals. Human hair was once saved to stuff things such as pin cushions, seat cushions, and pet toys. One can easily make small stuffed items from used hair and that is a great way to use it without having to buy new materials. Woven hair can be used to make jewelry products. Human hair dresses are readily available, and it is a fine example of recycling and putting into use of human hair.

However, now even smaller quantities of human hair, including much of what used to end up in the barbershop’s wastebasket are being recycled into a variety of gardening products that encourage healthy plant life and naturally deter unwanted pests in the garden. In addition to that human hair can be composted as well. Many people primarily collect, sanitize, and market human hair to be used as a consumer good. Our recycled hair products will be targeted toward the home gardener who will benefit from hair’s numerous elemental characteristics and its strong human scent. Clippings of human hair contain an extremely high nutrient value which, when utilized and mixed with potting soil, will produce a higher quality plant food and soil enhancer than what is currently on the market. Human hair, in common with wool, silk, and other organic materials, has very high nitrogen content, and in the soil, nitrogen encourages tissue growth. If the sweepings from a barber shop were regularly applied to a compost heap, an enormous amount of nitrogen could be recovered.